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Author Topic: Water stroage problem. Looking for ideas  (Read 363 times)

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Offline jc

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Water stroage problem. Looking for ideas
« on: January 24, 2013, 04:30:43 PM »
I have 2 50 gal barrels with lids hooked together about 4" from the top with 3/4" PVC. After one fills it fills the other. Hooked up to a down spout. With faucets for draining on the bottom / side

First, I can't put them in any shelter. And they are not close to any elect outlet. I have the lids on

Now, problem.  Both barrels froze solid.
JC

Offline cd

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Re: Water stroage problem. Looking for ideas
« Reply #1 on: January 24, 2013, 04:59:43 PM »
That's a problem. Depending on the climate, some use downspout diverters to prevent accumulation of water during the winter where it might freeze.

Others of us, like me, have part of my tanks buried below the frost line, plus NC doesn't get cold for super long.

So you might want to look into a diverter, if the barrels haven't burst. If they haven't, I guess you can just wait for them to thaw?


Offline jc

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Re: Water stroage problem. Looking for ideas
« Reply #2 on: January 24, 2013, 06:03:46 PM »
Ya, my diverter fills up both then backs off to the usual flow route
JC

Offline pslblog

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Re: Water stroage problem. Looking for ideas
« Reply #3 on: January 24, 2013, 07:40:43 PM »
I have 2 50 gal barrels with lids hooked together about 4" from the top with 3/4" PVC. After one fills it fills the other. Hooked up to a down spout. With faucets for draining on the bottom / side
First, I can't put them in any shelter. And they are not close to any elect outlet. I have the lids on
Now, problem.  Both barrels froze solid.

I'd say that for today, your water storage solution is not working and any fix is strategic and in the future. You need a way to keep water inside, and doing that with a downspout filling is fraught.

In my house, I have a drain in one corner of the basement so I can keep water inside and drain it internally. Last year a record flash flood caused a problem, but that was the first time in a decade. Even then my stored water ignored the flooding.

My suggestion is to find a place in your house that you can spare that is near to a drain point. I'd fill the barrels from a hose unless you are cycling them multiple times a month. I change water fills every six months.

Based on my neighbor who had some collection barrels here in Portland, you are only one or two orders of magnitude shy of a useful roof drainage storage solution. You need thousands of gallons to water a significant garden or go off the grid. Hundreds aren't going to do the job.

Offline BooMushroom

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Re: Water stroage problem. Looking for ideas
« Reply #4 on: January 25, 2013, 10:39:36 AM »
Based on my neighbor who had some collection barrels here in Portland, you are only one or two orders of magnitude shy of a useful roof drainage storage solution. You need thousands of gallons to water a significant garden or go off the grid. Hundreds aren't going to do the job.

Don't let the perfect be the enemy of the good! Having 100 gallons of water on hand makes him better prepared for disruption of drinking water than 99.5% of the population.  If the goal is to be able to maintain a garden in a drought, sure.  But if the goal is to not suffer dehydration if the city water fails or is contaminated, he's doing good.

Offline Bonnie

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Re: Water stroage problem. Looking for ideas
« Reply #5 on: January 25, 2013, 03:07:18 PM »
Other than moving to a warmer climate, here's a couple or 3 of suggestions.

First a disclaimer: I know water is heavy, but really have no idea how much 50 gallons weighs.

Could the barrels be moved to a warmer spot with a hand truck? 

Or, next year, fill smaller containers from from the barrels & store them in a warmer place.

If you have the money, a cistern might be worth the investment.
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Bonnie
Opportunity Farm
NE WA

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Offline Drang

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Re: Water stroage problem. Looking for ideas
« Reply #6 on: January 25, 2013, 05:58:23 PM »
First a disclaimer: I know water is heavy, but really have no idea how much 50 gallons weighs.
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Offline Haverwilde

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Re: Water stroage problem. Looking for ideas
« Reply #7 on: January 25, 2013, 06:38:34 PM »
"A pint is a pound, the world around." Or so the saying goes [although it is a little more than a pound]. So fifty gallons weighs over 400 pounds, with the barrel call it 450 lbs. On the boat, 70 gallons lasts about 3 days for all uses except the toilet. For drinking at a gallon a day, 50 gallons will last for quite a awhile.

Basement storage and insulated crawl space storage should keep the water liquid. The larger the volume the longer it will remain unfrozen ouside. I have one house with a 10,000 gallon cistern outside. Even in '0' degree weather the tank is liquid, although the line to the house freezes.

In my residence I have the cistern in the crawlspace [it is 7 feet high so I don't have to crawl, I access it fhrough a closet floor trap door. There I have two vinyl tanks that hold a total of about 20,000 gallons.

If you decide to put tanks in the basement, you might consider buying a 12 volt maritme water pump. They have a 3+ gallon/minute flow rate which is adequate for most uses.

Since my cistern is my source of water I have a standard 220 volt shallow well pump.
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