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Author Topic: The new Baker Creek Catalog has arrived!  (Read 855 times)

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Offline four + four

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The new Baker Creek Catalog has arrived!
« on: January 09, 2013, 09:04:50 PM »
Already planning garden choices for this summer's garden.  How funny we are.  We just yanked the last of the pumpkins out of the root cellar and canned them during the Thanksgiving holiday and now we are already dreaming of what will be planted where. 

In this edition is a great article called "GMOs: Is the End Near?" by Jeffrey M. Smith.  This article brings up how the herbicide-tolerant GMOs "drinks poison, and how corn and cotton varieties are engineered to produce their own."  He shares in the article how the newly inserted genes product Bt-toxin which breaks open the stomach of insets and kills them.  But the insects have now morphed into another strain; as Smith says, the bugs "took a lesson from the weeds and are now developing resistance to the Bt corn and cotton plants."  Are we raising "Terminator" hoppers?

I had read somewhere, gosh I wish I could remember the source, that if 20% of gardeners requested/demanded heirloom seeds, the market would agree to ramp up the non-GMO market. 

Also, Baker Creek also offers a magazine called, "Heirloom Gardener."  A GREAT subscription and read.  It has given us a description of astrican apples.  Anyone hear of them or know where we may obtain?  Amish...any help here?  When we lived in another part of the state, we had an astrican tree...the apples were unbelievable.  More eating, though than canning but does make a nice pie.  It has a Russian heritage.

Offline Haverwilde

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Re: The new Baker Creek Catalog has arrived!
« Reply #1 on: January 09, 2013, 10:52:52 PM »
I got mine too. Great catalog.
And regarding apples, anyone have a reference for ancient apple varieties? I am planning my retirement farm in eastern washington, and would love to do the research before I have to start the investments. I hope to buy my place this spring.
Diabolus fecit, ut id facerem!


Offline BooMushroom

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Re: The new Baker Creek Catalog has arrived!
« Reply #2 on: January 09, 2013, 11:18:02 PM »
Already planning garden choices for this summer's garden.  How funny we are.  We just yanked the last of the pumpkins out of the root cellar and canned them during the Thanksgiving holiday and now we are already dreaming of what will be planted where. 

In this edition is a great article called "GMOs: Is the End Near?" by Jeffrey M. Smith.  This article brings up how the herbicide-tolerant GMOs "drinks poison, and how corn and cotton varieties are engineered to produce their own."  He shares in the article how the newly inserted genes product Bt-toxin which breaks open the stomach of insets and kills them.  But the insects have now morphed into another strain; as Smith says, the bugs "took a lesson from the weeds and are now developing resistance to the Bt corn and cotton plants."  Are we raising "Terminator" hoppers?

I had read somewhere, gosh I wish I could remember the source, that if 20% of gardeners requested/demanded heirloom seeds, the market would agree to ramp up the non-GMO market. 

Also, Baker Creek also offers a magazine called, "Heirloom Gardener."  A GREAT subscription and read.  It has given us a description of astrican apples.  Anyone hear of them or know where we may obtain?  Amish...any help here?  When we lived in another part of the state, we had an astrican tree...the apples were unbelievable.  More eating, though than canning but does make a nice pie.  It has a Russian heritage.

Does it mention if the Bt-toxin break open in humans?  It seems to me that THAT might be pertinent information.

Offline Langenator

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Re: The new Baker Creek Catalog has arrived!
« Reply #3 on: January 10, 2013, 08:52:14 AM »
Gah...I'm moving in June, which means I'll probably have zilch for a garden this year.

Except my Meyer Improved Lemon in the big pot that's going with me.  Although it's still to young for fruit.
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“In the house of a wise man are stores of food, wine, and oil, but the foolish man devours all he has.” Proverbs 21:20
"We are content with discord, we are content with alarms, we are content with blood, but we will never be content with a master." -Pashtun malik, 1815

Offline Bonnie

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Re: The new Baker Creek Catalog has arrived!
« Reply #4 on: January 10, 2013, 11:41:09 AM »
I am planning my retirement farm in eastern washington, and would love to do the research before I have to start the investments. I hope to buy my place this spring.

Whereabout? I'm north of Spokane.
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Offline four + four

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Re: The new Baker Creek Catalog has arrived!
« Reply #5 on: January 10, 2013, 10:07:56 PM »
And regarding apples, anyone have a reference for ancient apple varieties? I am planning my retirement farm in eastern washington, and would love to do the research before I have to start the investments. I hope to buy my place this spring.

Haverwilde:  Baker Creek has a magazine called the "Heirloom Gardener" and the Fall 2012 edition is devoted to apples and the lead article is called "Antique Apples: Fruit From Our Past."  There are apples discussed I have never heard of  (have you ever heard of a Cox's orange pippin apple?  I haven't...just one of many mentioned in the magazine article) and then there is contact information for what they call "Old Apples."  This is where I was able to track a "lead" on the Russian astrican...we truly wish to get a tree or two going.  Oh, also there are very yummy recipes, also. 

Interestingly, the author shared that planting apple orchards was one of the first tasks early settlers undertook because apples were seen as a staple of life because many things could be made from apples from cider to sauce.  (Notice there is no "d" on sauce.)

Here is your apple trivia question for the night...This apple called the Esopus spitzenberg, is harvested in October and was the favorite of this famous person who doubted whether the experiment called America could/would survive?

BTW, you may subscribe for this magazine at:
Heirloom Gardener
2278 Baker Creek Road
Mansfield, MO 65704, or call 1-866-OLDSEED, or their Website is
www.herirloomgardener.com

Answer:  Thomas Jefferson

Offline ND Martin

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Re: The new Baker Creek Catalog has arrived!
« Reply #6 on: January 11, 2013, 12:16:32 AM »
'Tis the season for seed catalogs.  My wife can tell when I'm perusing the catalog pages because of my occasional exclamation like "Wow...we gotta try this!"  The remainder of the lawn is doomed.  ;-))  Actually, for the last few years the rule in the garden is that nothing gets planted that we can't eat.

I usually order from the BC catalog, and like the folks at One Green World who specialize in cold-tolerant fruits/veggies.  A great source for heirloom seeds and cuttings is Heirloom Seed Swap, a free exchange.

As for your apple variety queries, here's an excellent source that's named for the apple you referenced--Orange Pippen.  The Seattle Tree Fruit Society has a handy identifier for apple varieties.  Here's their page for Red Astrakhan.  Note the proper spelling, reflecting its heritage.

« Last Edit: January 11, 2013, 12:57:28 AM by ND Martin »

Offline Langenator

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Re: The new Baker Creek Catalog has arrived!
« Reply #7 on: January 11, 2013, 08:32:19 AM »

Here is your apple trivia question for the night...This apple called the Esopus spitzenberg, is harvested in October and was the favorite of this famous person who doubted whether the experiment called America could/would survive?

Spitzenberg...sounds German.  "Pointy mountain," roughly.
Fortuna Fortis Paratus
“In the house of a wise man are stores of food, wine, and oil, but the foolish man devours all he has.” Proverbs 21:20
"We are content with discord, we are content with alarms, we are content with blood, but we will never be content with a master." -Pashtun malik, 1815

Offline TsMom

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Re: The new Baker Creek Catalog has arrived!
« Reply #8 on: January 11, 2013, 09:40:22 AM »
I got my BC catalog a few weeks ago.  I could look at the pictures for days.  I don't have a big garden, and I am really just learning how to start.  I had great red and green okra last year.  My squash did well until those disgusting bugs took over.  Nothing else that I planted really grew well.  Of course, we are in a drought.  : )  My tomatoes were terrible, but my father-in-law figured out what I need to do differently this year.

This year my garden will be even smaller, because I am expecting baby late May.  I don't imagine that I will be super excited about planting a lot that month. 

Offline Flight-ER-Doc

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Re: The new Baker Creek Catalog has arrived!
« Reply #9 on: January 11, 2013, 10:32:13 AM »
We're going to be in PDARK most of the summer this year, and are planning on trying "square foot" garden planters.....see how they go.

Anyone tried that method?
Yes, I'm a physician.  No, I'm not YOUR physician.  Nothing I say here is medical advice.

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Offline TCC

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Re: The new Baker Creek Catalog has arrived!
« Reply #10 on: January 11, 2013, 11:35:16 AM »
I've used Square Foot gardening for years.  Depending on the soil I've had the best results with carrots and beets.  I tried leeks this year and while they did grow and we are using them, next year they will be NOT be planted in the same spacing as carrots.  We still have a couple dozen carrots left in the garden (protected).  We had a feed the other night and they were sooo much better than store bought.  We are in the Fraser Valley of Southern BC so last night was the first real frost with a low of -3 C.  But at least it is sunny...!

Offline Haverwilde

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Re: The new Baker Creek Catalog has arrived!
« Reply #11 on: January 17, 2013, 02:22:32 PM »
Bonnie, 4+4, and N.D.  Martin,

Sorry that I took so long to respond. I have been out of state for a while.

Bonnie, I am looking at two pieces of property in the Pomeroy area. Nothing definite yet. My brother has a place north of Spokane on the Canadian border, and family are moving into the tri-cities area, so my search is in the general area of the Palouse to the Tri-cities area. 100 years ago, Whitman county had more apple trees then any other county in Washington--now there are only a few. I spent some time looking at old trees to see if I could find some ancient varieties. But it will be faster to check the catalogs and the net.

4+4 and N.D. Thanks for the info, I will be spending more time this week examining it all.
Diabolus fecit, ut id facerem!

Offline ND Martin

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Re: The new Baker Creek Catalog has arrived!
« Reply #12 on: February 17, 2013, 10:00:11 AM »
Seems to me that one should involve taste buds in the selection of fruit varieties.  Check for local organizations like the  Seattle Fruit Tree Society that I linked who may have some kind of tasting fair.   Doing that with apples is a bit problematic because there's such a broad range of maturity dates.  We're fortunate that an orchard two miles down the road grows over 30 varieties of apple and a dozen or so peach.

Contrary to the media image, New Jersey lives up to its nickname--The Garden State, and it's no accident that the classic hybrid tomato is the Rutgers.   Rutgers (the state's university) has an agricultural research farm locally and every year they hold a tomato tasting festival where folks can sample dozens of varieties--new hybrids and heirlooms, all open pollinated and no GMO.



 

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