Max Velocity Tactical



Your Ad Here - Email for Info

You Can Shop At Amazon and Help Support Emergency-Preps.com Without It Costing You One Thin Dime - Click Here to Learn How!

Author Topic: Waldo Canyon  (Read 6653 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline Langenator

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1383
  • Karma: +17/-1
  • Gender: Male
Waldo Canyon
« on: June 27, 2012, 07:57:24 PM »
Top priority wildfire in the country

I know parts of the AF Academy have been evac'ed, and they may be doing a crash training program with troops at Fort Carson.

Anyone on here in Colorado?

Oh yeah, and it's been burning for two weeks, but The One will bestow his presence on Friday.
Fortuna Fortis Paratus
“In the house of a wise man are stores of food, wine, and oil, but the foolish man devours all he has.” Proverbs 21:20
"We are content with discord, we are content with alarms, we are content with blood, but we will never be content with a master." -Pashtun malik, 1815

Offline AuricTech

  • Interrogator at Large
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 766
  • Karma: +12/-1
    • AuricTech Thoughts
Re: Waldo Canyon
« Reply #1 on: June 27, 2012, 09:00:47 PM »
Top priority wildfire in the country

I know parts of the AF Academy have been evac'ed, and they may be doing a crash training program with troops at Fort Carson.

Anyone on here in Colorado?

Oh yeah, and it's been burning for two weeks, but The One will bestow his presence on Friday.

I can see this as a theme for protesters, with variations on "Heal the planet by stopping this fire!"

Of course, since the combustion in question powers neither the generation of electricity nor the vehicles that move both people and stuff from Point A to Point B, fighting it doesn't address Our Nero Zero's apparent desire to sacrifice our nation's economy on the altar of AGW.
American parachutists...devils in baggy pants...are less than 100 meters from my outpost line. I can't sleep at night; they pop up from nowhere and we never know when or how they will strike next. Seems like the black-hearted devils are everywhere....


Offline Suburban

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 85
  • Karma: +2/-0
Re: Waldo Canyon
« Reply #2 on: June 27, 2012, 09:31:31 PM »
Anyone on here in Colorado?

I am in Colorado, but thankfully it appears the nearest fire is over 20 miles away.

The other big concern is flooding due to lack of vegetation, as a result of the fires of the last few years.

Offline Drang

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2450
  • Karma: +29/-3
    • The Cluemeter
Re: Waldo Canyon
« Reply #3 on: June 27, 2012, 10:11:31 PM »
Good timing, I was about to post this from the blog:
Quote
Courtesy Emergency Management magazine: Dynamic Maps Track Colorado Wildfires

Google Crisis Response map.

Esri map.

While our time in Colorado Springs was not unalloyed bliss, we do have fond memories of the area, and are watching the news closely.

SF writer Sarah Hoyt is in the Springs, and blogging the experience:
I Wanted To Post On The End Of The World
The State of The State (Of Colorado and The Fires)
This Is The Way The World Ends
The United States Constitution
(c) 1791.
All Rights Reserved.

Offline Langenator

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1383
  • Karma: +17/-1
  • Gender: Male
Re: Waldo Canyon
« Reply #4 on: June 28, 2012, 09:17:51 AM »
Another map viewer:  Geomac.gov

Use the drop down at the upper right to select the Waldo Canyon CO fire.
Fortuna Fortis Paratus
“In the house of a wise man are stores of food, wine, and oil, but the foolish man devours all he has.” Proverbs 21:20
"We are content with discord, we are content with alarms, we are content with blood, but we will never be content with a master." -Pashtun malik, 1815

Offline Langenator

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1383
  • Karma: +17/-1
  • Gender: Male
Re: Waldo Canyon
« Reply #5 on: June 29, 2012, 09:53:39 AM »
Photos from HuffPo

The first picture is really striking to me - how it looks like the 'greenbelt' (woodline) served almost like a fuze to light off the houses on either side of it.  The smaller (landscaper planted) trees in the front yards look totally untouched.
Fortuna Fortis Paratus
“In the house of a wise man are stores of food, wine, and oil, but the foolish man devours all he has.” Proverbs 21:20
"We are content with discord, we are content with alarms, we are content with blood, but we will never be content with a master." -Pashtun malik, 1815

Offline ColoConsrvCowboy

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 97
  • Karma: +2/-1
  • Gender: Male
Re: Waldo Canyon
« Reply #6 on: June 29, 2012, 06:49:32 PM »
Those pictures are absolutely terrifying.

We live in Colorado, and fortunately the only effects we have seen are a film of ashy mid on anything outside, nice blood-red sunsets, and an early morning asthma attack that hit my wife when a smoke cloud shifted our way.

A friend of ours lost his large, beautiful house in the Lower North Fork fire a few months ago. They had literally about a half-hour to evacuate a few belongings and their pets, including two horses. Everything else, including a room full of mementos from a long and storied career in the USAF and defense industry, was lost.

Lest anyone think that this just happens in the forested mountainous regions, look up the Last Chance fire, which burned about 48,000 acres out on the plains a few weeks ago.

My wife and I are supposed to go on a short trip next week to Grand Junction, CO and Moab, UT. However, those plans are in jeopardy due to a fire near GJT that had I-70 shut down for a while today.

We can't get our usual torrential summer monsoon rains soon enough...

Frank

Offline Ken

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1008
  • Karma: +8/-0
  • Gender: Male
Re: Waldo Canyon
« Reply #7 on: June 30, 2012, 05:52:09 PM »
something a friend from the area sent me

http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=ZBA7eHY022k

it's long....
“If mankind is to survive, then throughout man’s history except for a very few years the word “ship” will mean “space ship.”
Arthur C. Clarke

Offline Langenator

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1383
  • Karma: +17/-1
  • Gender: Male
Re: Waldo Canyon
« Reply #8 on: July 01, 2012, 07:07:57 AM »
What's somewhat amazing is that the fires in Utah and Montana, in which dozens of homes have also burned, get almost no press.  One in MT is almost 10 times as big as Waldo Canyon (244 sq mi vs 28).

I wonder if it's because Colorado Springs is a city that wire service reporters and news types back east are familiar with.

And Doc - stay safe.
Fortuna Fortis Paratus
“In the house of a wise man are stores of food, wine, and oil, but the foolish man devours all he has.” Proverbs 21:20
"We are content with discord, we are content with alarms, we are content with blood, but we will never be content with a master." -Pashtun malik, 1815

Offline Les Nessman

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 152
  • Karma: +5/-0
Re: Waldo Canyon
« Reply #9 on: July 01, 2012, 11:20:01 AM »
Holy cow, those pics are horrifying.

I've often thought that a good invention that would  be useful in areas like this would be a system of hidden water lines running along the roofline, gutters and perimeter of the house with spray nozzles on it. Up close they might look like small lightning rods sticking up.
The fires swoop in, as you evacuate you turn the pump system on, and the water starts spraying the roof, walls and immediate surrounding area of your home.
By the time the fire gets to the house, everything is soaked and the water continues to spray as the fire rages all around.

You would probably want a cistern and generator to go with this, as city water and electricity would probably be down during a fire. But for the Prep-minded this would be S.O.P.

An unattended generator should be able to run long enough; when these fires race through they don't really last that long. If the structure catches fire, sure it will last a while; but if you can prevent it just for a few hours the fires move on and everything around that can burn, has burned.

You could incorporate these pipes into the structure when you build the building, or even retrofit the pipes on the outside if the climate is hot.

Why wouldn't this work?

Offline Langenator

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1383
  • Karma: +17/-1
  • Gender: Male
Re: Re: Waldo Canyon
« Reply #10 on: July 01, 2012, 11:39:23 AM »
I assume you're implying a pump to go with your cistern and generator.

One big problem might be the HOA. I'm not a plumber, but I'd guess that even the smallest available metal piping is cosiderably larger than lightning rods. Now, put up a solar water heating array and disguise the piping as part of that, maybe...

But there's still the gamble that the fuel supply for the genset won't run out in the time between when you evac and when (if) the fire arrives.

Sent from my ADR6400L using Tapatalk 2
Fortuna Fortis Paratus
“In the house of a wise man are stores of food, wine, and oil, but the foolish man devours all he has.” Proverbs 21:20
"We are content with discord, we are content with alarms, we are content with blood, but we will never be content with a master." -Pashtun malik, 1815

Offline Les Nessman

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 152
  • Karma: +5/-0
Re: Waldo Canyon
« Reply #11 on: July 01, 2012, 12:20:38 PM »
I'm sure a way could be devised to almost completely hide the nozzles.

And unless at almost gunpoint, I would never ever live under any HOA, unless I am the absolute dictator-for-life of said HOA. But yeah, I do understand that many people live in these mini-gulag HOAs; sucks to be them, hope they enjoy their fires. :P

Fuel (and cistern) could be scaled up to whatever you want to prep for. Many of these McMansions on expensive real estate look like they could afford the scratch to pay for my HouseSaverSystem (tm).

Maybe turn the system on when you evac, the system gives a light mist to everything so everything is soaked; then when an outside thermostat is triggered by the actual fire getting close, the system then kicks into high gear spraying sheets of water over everything at a higher volume.

Offline cd

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1161
  • Karma: +10/-2
Re: Waldo Canyon
« Reply #12 on: July 01, 2012, 01:56:50 PM »
I've been thinking in terms of a masonry exterior and metal roof. Or even a terracotta roof.

Offline Langenator

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1383
  • Karma: +17/-1
  • Gender: Male
Re: Waldo Canyon
« Reply #13 on: July 01, 2012, 02:09:53 PM »
I've been thinking in terms of a masonry exterior and metal roof. Or even a terracotta roof.

I think masonry/adobe/rammed earth walls combined with a tile/terracotta or metal roof and roll-down metal shutters for the windows would probably allow a house to withstand the radiant heat long enough for the fire to move past it.

Be an interesting test to run.
Fortuna Fortis Paratus
“In the house of a wise man are stores of food, wine, and oil, but the foolish man devours all he has.” Proverbs 21:20
"We are content with discord, we are content with alarms, we are content with blood, but we will never be content with a master." -Pashtun malik, 1815

Offline ColoConsrvCowboy

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 97
  • Karma: +2/-1
  • Gender: Male
Re: Waldo Canyon
« Reply #14 on: July 01, 2012, 07:36:09 PM »
Where you build your home can be as much of a fire deterrent as the materials it's made of. Take a look at the following photo library, and give special attention to pictures 41 and 44.

The house in #41 is built on a rock outcropping with very few trees around it.

The house in #44 has a metal roof.

The biggest issue I see with a pump and water system like you're talking about is that for places like Colorado, New Mexico, and Arizona, we're in an extremely arid area where significant precipitation for a cistern isn't always guaranteed. But in an area with lots of water, fogger-type nozzles that can put out a huge volume of water would be a great way to keep a house protected.

Frank

Offline cd

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1161
  • Karma: +10/-2
Re: Waldo Canyon
« Reply #15 on: July 01, 2012, 08:55:11 PM »
I think masonry/adobe/rammed earth walls combined with a tile/terracotta or metal roof and roll-down metal shutters for the windows would probably allow a house to withstand the radiant heat long enough for the fire to move past it.

Be an interesting test to run.
One of my concerns with the monolithic dome construction is that the closed cell foam is on the outside, concrete on the inside. This:

http://www.monolithic.com/stories/feature-home-hunsaker-utah

intruigues me somewhat.

I'm not sure that would be sufficient to keep the fire from igniting the foam. Almost like you'd want a oreo of 3-4" concrete - 3-4" foam - 3 - 4" concrete to have some decent protection.

I've also considered dry-stacked, surfaced-bonded cinderblock in that kind of oreo style. (That's where the metal roof thingy would come into play.)

The flamablity of the standard monolithic domes (fabric + foam) is a downside. Of course the concrete on the inside wouldn't burn, but it would sure be a mess.

Offline North

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 83
  • Karma: +2/-1
Re: Waldo Canyon
« Reply #16 on: July 01, 2012, 11:59:22 PM »
You could always shotcrete the outside of one of those domes.  I seem to remember seeing some that are not foam on the outside, but now I can't remember if thats because they are not insulated at all...

IIRC someone was making them by using an inflatable dome and shotcrete.  Just inflate it, spray it with shotcrete then deflate once it had hardened.  You should then be able to spray foam the inside.


 


Your Ad Here - Email for Info
Help Support E-P.com
Even A Buck Makes A Difference!
Or Make Convenient Monthly
Donations By Selecting
A Payment Option
Payment Options