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Author Topic: From Little Acorns....  (Read 6183 times)

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Offline Bill Quick

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From Little Acorns....
« on: July 11, 2011, 11:23:25 AM »
Acorns as Survival Food « Suburban Survivalist
A lot of prepping involves food storage and learning how to hunt, but especially gardening and small-scale farming. I grew up in a rural area and am familiar with both hunting and farming, but am interested in other food sources often overlooked. Acorns seem to fall in that category and if you have a lot of oak trees they could be a game changer in hard times.
Sometimes we forget that if we are reduced to a hunter-gatherer culture, gathering will still play a very large role.

What other commonly overlooked "gathered" food resources can you come up with?
« Last Edit: July 11, 2011, 12:52:56 PM by Bill Quick »
"You can get a lot farther with a kind word and a gun than a kind word alone."  --   Al Capone

Offline Rancher

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Re: From Little Acorns....
« Reply #1 on: July 11, 2011, 11:57:27 AM »
In my part of the country pinion pines are common, so pine nuts are often plentiful in season.


Offline Paul

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Re: From Little Acorns....
« Reply #2 on: August 21, 2011, 08:21:35 PM »
Wild rice, cranberries and cattails (both the roots and a flour of sorts that can be used to make a kind of bread) immediately come to mind along with maple syrup, and maple sugar.   Birch Beer (regular and alcoholic) also Sassafras for both tea and Root Beer;  beechnuts (delicious,) rose hips, spruce gum (many individulas from our area made their living collecting spruce gum for sale before Wrigley drove them out of business.)  Cambium, (the word Adirondack means "Bark Eater," an Iroquois name for the Algonquin tribe that frequented the area.  The list is almost endless.

Offline Earth Girl

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Re: From Little Acorns....
« Reply #3 on: August 21, 2011, 09:08:06 PM »
Just this week, I picked enough wild grapes to make two batches of jelly.  They are very tart with an intense grape flavor, but very high in pectin.  So you need to add sugar but nothing else.  I couldn't eat them, but my 2 year-old granddaughter popped them in her mouth like candy. 

It takes a lot of work to make acorns edible.  You have to boil them several times to remove the tannin.  "Acorns are best ate indirectly in the form of pork."  Patricia Rupp in  Red Oaks and Black Birches.

Offline Paul

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Re: From Little Acorns....
« Reply #4 on: August 21, 2011, 09:34:35 PM »
Wild grapes are very high in tartrate.  (Some varieties of wild grapes are a lot worse than others.)  If you get too much on your skin, it can cause quite a bit of pain.  It can also give you a sore mouth when drinking the juice.  Fortunately it is quite easy to remove.  If you put the juice in the fridge for a day or two, it will settle out as a grey sludge in the bottom of the container.  Just pour off the good looking juice at the top and the juice will be much sweeter and pretty much tartrate free.

Offline Amisheggpicker

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Re: From Little Acorns....
« Reply #5 on: August 21, 2011, 09:37:09 PM »
Hey Paul...can you give a little more info on the spruce gum?
Proverbs 21:20  In the house of the wise are stores of choice food and oil,

but a foolish man devours all he has.

Offline Paul

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Re: From Little Acorns....
« Reply #6 on: August 21, 2011, 10:51:14 PM »
I don't know a lot about spruce gum other than they collected it with a pole that had a tin can on the end that was used to scrape the gum off the trees.  The gum was then cleaned, packaged and sold all over the country. 

Spruce gum is the pitch that gathers at the site of any break or cut in the bark of the black spruce tree.  Kids around here still chew it straight off the tree but commercially I think most of it is flavored by mixing in a drop or so of wintergreen or peppermint oil, etc.  Without the flavoring it has a taste that is not unpleasant, but different.  Before I switched to "store boughts" I chewed it on occasion when I was out in the woods and could see how it might become addictive.

Offline razorbacker

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Re: From Little Acorns....
« Reply #7 on: August 22, 2011, 03:10:09 PM »
Just this week, I picked enough wild grapes to make two batches of jelly.  They are very tart with an intense grape flavor, but very high in pectin.  So you need to add sugar but nothing else.  I couldn't eat them, but my 2 year-old granddaughter popped them in her mouth like candy.

Do you mean muscadines, or wild grapes in general?  While the Italians brought grapes here back in the late 19th century, we don't have grapes growing wild.  Except for muscadine grapes. 

Quote
It takes a lot of work to make acorns edible.  You have to boil them several times to remove the tannin.  "Acorns are best ate indirectly in the form of pork."  Patricia Rupp in  Red Oaks and Black Birches.

An ersatz coffee can be made by roasting acorns, then grinding them and brewing.  I have been told that the resulting drink is the real reason that the rebels surrendered during the Late Unpleasantness Between the States.

Offline xtron

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Re: From Little Acorns....
« Reply #8 on: August 22, 2011, 07:02:26 PM »
where to start....blackberries, rasberries, acorns, here in the south, kudzu, burdock(leaves only), plantia, lambsquarters, dandillion, elderberry. i'm sure i missed lots of good eats out there.

Offline Earth Girl

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Re: From Little Acorns....
« Reply #9 on: August 22, 2011, 07:57:24 PM »
I picked the native North American grapes, Vitis riparia.  From looking at several horticultural/educational websites, it appears that they are native as far south as West Virginia and Tennessee.  I suspect they are not as common in Arkansas as in the northern states.  I am forever removing them from our timber trees, as the vines can get 50' long.  I was pleasantly surprised to learn the species name is riparia, since we picked the grapes from the riverboat. 

When I attended Girl Scout camp, the most memorable thing we did was swing across a canyon on a grapevine.  i can't believe the adults let us do that.  The vines don't break easily but can become dislodged if pulled hard enough.

Offline BooMushroom

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Re: From Little Acorns....
« Reply #10 on: August 06, 2012, 06:40:54 PM »
Miner's lettuce! My kid sisters and I would pick these by the dozen, and eat them raw. They grow all over in California, from under oak trees to beside my in-laws' driveway.


 

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