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Author Topic: not for barter...but for free  (Read 12153 times)

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Offline cd

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Re: not for barter...but for free
« Reply #25 on: April 06, 2011, 08:42:38 PM »
For all those who sent envelopes for seeds....the post office returned the envelopes in my mailbox and said I needed more postage...so I put another stamp on them and they will be REMAILED tomorrow...sorry folks in the delay...

 :o

How many pounds of seeds did you put in? ;)

Offline Amisheggpicker

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Re: not for barter...but for free
« Reply #26 on: April 06, 2011, 08:51:48 PM »
two stamps...
Proverbs 21:20  In the house of the wise are stores of choice food and oil,

but a foolish man devours all he has.


Offline CERDIP

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Re: not for barter...but for free
« Reply #27 on: April 08, 2011, 01:00:55 AM »
two stamps...

For us non-Americans, how much is one stamp?
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Offline Drang

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Re: not for barter...but for free
« Reply #28 on: April 08, 2011, 11:43:25 AM »
Currently, first class postage is forty-four cents.
You can buy "forever" stamps at that price which will still be valid first class postage after the rates go up.
Rates go up so often that new first class stamps don't have a price on them anymore, which is a real pain in the @$$ when you're trying to figure out how much "make-up postage" on an envelope.

BTW, the USPS does not care if you pay full value for stamps, as long as they get full value--one of our local retailers was selling stamps at slightly less than face value in a coupon book, the theory being that they weren't losing a lot of money even if no one used the coupons, but the coupons had to be used there, so they would actually make money on the deal...
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Offline Amisheggpicker

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Re: not for barter...but for free
« Reply #29 on: April 19, 2011, 08:17:43 PM »
wow, sorry Auri Tech, I missed this....2 stamps will be fine....

For all those who sent envelopes....did you receive your seeds?  I always worry about the mail system loosing the mail or ripping the letters open....( my grandmother, Great aunt, mother, father and sister inlaw all worked in the post office....that's why I get so nervous...hahahahah!)
Proverbs 21:20  In the house of the wise are stores of choice food and oil,

but a foolish man devours all he has.

Offline Drang

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Re: not for barter...but for free
« Reply #30 on: April 19, 2011, 08:44:33 PM »
Ooops, meant to post we got 'em last week.   :-[  Yeah, I still forget to write "thank you" notes...or, for that matter, sometimes to mail presents...  :-[
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Offline cd

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Re: not for barter...but for free
« Reply #31 on: April 19, 2011, 11:32:26 PM »
Yeah, I got them. But I forgot I used a business UPS Store box and hadn't been there in a couple of weeks. :-[

Thanks much!

Offline Dale00

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Re: not for barter...but for free
« Reply #32 on: April 20, 2011, 05:44:03 AM »
Seeds received - Thanks!
"Test everything. Hold onto the good." 1 Thes 5:21

Offline Mr. Bingley

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Re: not for barter...but for free
« Reply #33 on: May 07, 2011, 05:05:53 PM »
Got them and planted today! Thanks again!

Offline cd

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Re: not for barter...but for free
« Reply #34 on: May 27, 2011, 10:56:31 AM »
FWIW (and that's probably not much), don't give up on these Amish Egg squash seeds.

I started 18 in one of those little jiffy greenhouse thingies probably 3-4 weeks ago. Initially only 4 came up. I thought, that's OK, I gotta put them in separate planter anyhow. The seperate planter thingy being half a pickle barrel. Since I replanted them, at least 5 more have come up. Here's a pic:



You can see the originals in the four "corners" and the others, for lack of anywhere else to go at the moment, in the middle and other four corners.

Doubtless anyone has to be a better gardener than I, so maybe no one else will have my issues, but just as an FWIW.

Also, I had real problems getting my peppers to seed, had to go buy some.

I'll post garden updates elsewhither...

Offline Bonnie

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Re: not for barter...but for free
« Reply #35 on: September 27, 2011, 10:27:19 AM »
Amisheggpicker -

I'm a newbie so didn't get in on the give-away. Would you be selling some seeds from this year's plants? It sounds like a good squash to try.

God bless,
Bonnie
Opportunity Farm
NE WA
God bless,
Bonnie
Opportunity Farm
NE WA

"While we have the opportunity, let us do good to all." Galatians 6:10

BonniesBooks.net

Offline Amisheggpicker

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Re: not for barter...but for free
« Reply #36 on: September 27, 2011, 05:50:42 PM »
Sure thing....ours arn't quite ready to pick yet though....but pm me, and I'll give you my address....you just need to send me a self addressed two stamped envelope....other than that they are FREE....

Has anyone else grown there squash...and are they mature yet?
Proverbs 21:20  In the house of the wise are stores of choice food and oil,

but a foolish man devours all he has.

Offline Mr. Bingley

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Re: not for barter...but for free
« Reply #37 on: September 27, 2011, 06:40:24 PM »
i've got one that's about maybe 8 inches long by about 3 wide; how big do they get?

Offline cd

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Re: not for barter...but for free
« Reply #38 on: September 27, 2011, 07:07:51 PM »
Some powdery white mildew got all of mine. We got two, really small squash before they expired. Not a problem with the seeds, they grew vigorously before that.

Offline Amisheggpicker

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Re: not for barter...but for free
« Reply #39 on: September 27, 2011, 07:42:50 PM »
Mr Bingley....they grow a little bit bigger than that....about 6-8 inches across and about 10-11 inches long...you want to wait until the vine part of the plant dies off...then you let the squash "harden" before actually baking it...about 2 weeks....

CD...aawww the dreaded powdery mildew.....I don't know a gardener yet whom has be left unscathed by that dreaded fungus...but I have found something that is quite successfull in combating it...MILK.....believe it or not...
Here is a list of remedies that I found on the "net"  I have only used the milk...and it was so successfull that I have never used anything else....

And if anyone wants more seeds, just let me know....I only send a few, because that is all you need...they reproduce well....

Organic remedies
Cinnamon Oil and Tea
Cinnamon is an effective destroyer of powdery mildew, with an effectiveness rate of 50-70%. It won�t kill it completely but it will keep it in check somewhat. It also potentiates other suppressive sprays so it is good to use in combination. To make your own, boil water, turn off the heat and add one ounce of ground cinnamon to one and a half pints water. Let the tea cool to room temperature. Add half a pint of 100 proof grain alcohol or rubbing alcohol and let sit. Strain the cinnamon. The spray is ready to use. A faster method is to add 2 teaspoons cinnamon oil to one pint of water and a dash of castile soap. Other herbs are also fungicidal. Clove, rosemary, and wintergreen oils are used in some botanical fungicides. The solution should consist of no more than 2% oil.
Garlic

Garlic is antifungal and anti-bacterial and has several pathways for destroying fungi including its high sulfur content. It can also be added to other anti-fungal sprays. Several garlic sprays are available commercially.
A homemade formula: Soak three ounces of crushed garlic in one ounce of neem or sesame oil and 100 proof or higher drinking alcohol or 70% or higher rubbing alcohol for a day or two. Strain. Then soak the garlic in a cup of water for a day. Strain. Mix the oil/alcohol, soaked water and 1 tablespoon liquid castile soap in a gallon container. Then fill with water and shake. The formula is ready to use.
A simpler brew consists of a teaspoon of garlic oil in a pint of water. To keep the oil and water mixed add a 1/8teaspoon of soap. Use garlic as a vaccination. Spray on new growth before there is a sign of infection.
Garlic is a general purpose insecticide as well as fungicide, so it should be used with caution on outdoor plants. It kills beneficial insects as well as plant pests.
Hydrogen Peroxide
Hydrogen peroxide (hp) is a contact fungicide that leaves no residue. It is an oxidized product of water and has an extra oxygen atom that is slightly negatively charged. When it comes in contact with the fungi the oxygen atoms attach to molecules on the cell walls, oxidizing or �burning� them.
Household hp sold in drug stores has a concentration of 3%. Garden shops sell 10% hp. Zerotol� contains 27% hydrogen peroxide and an unstated amount of peroxyacetic acid. Together they have a more potent chemistry than hp, with an activity of about 40% hp. It is considered hazardous because it can cause skin burn similar to that caused by concentrated acids.
To treat plants with drug store grade 3% hp use 4 1/2 tablespoons and fill to make a pint of solution, or a quart of hp to 3 quarts of water. With horticultural grade 10% hp use about 4 teaspoons per pint, 5 ounces per gallon. With Zerotol� use about 1 teaspoon per pint, 2 1/2 tablespoons per gallon.
Limonene
Limonene is refined from the oil of citrus rinds. It has a pleasant citrus odor and is the active ingredient in many of the new cleaning products. It also has fungicidal qualities. I�ve used pure diluted limonene and it controlled powdery mildew, but did not eradicate it. Perhaps a higher concentration would have been more successful. Start using 0.5-1% limonene in water 1/2-1 teaspoon per pint.
Milk
Milk kills powdery mildew so well that both home and commercial rose growers all over the world have adopted it for their fungicidal sprays. Use one part milk to nine parts water. I�ve only used 1% milk, but other recipes call for either whole or skim milk and use up to 1 part in 5 milk. Some recipes add garlic or cinnamon to the mix. When using more than 30% milk, a benign mold is reported to grow on top of the leaves. Use a milk spray at the first sign of infection then protect the new growth weekly.
Messenger�
Messenger�s active ingredient is a naturally occurring protein called harpin that stimulates the plant�s own natural defense system. It has been proven to promote more vigorous hardier plants that are more resistant to disease and have increased yields. It is used to prevent infection and decrease its virulence
Neem Oil
Neem oil is pressed from the seed of the neem tree (Azadirachta indica), native to Southeast Asia, but now cultivated worldwide. Neem oil has low mammalian toxicity. It degrades rapidly once it is applied so it is safe for the environment including non-target species and beneficial insects.
Neem oil protects plants with its fungicidal properties: it disrupts the organism�s metabolism on contact, forms a barrier between the plant and the invading fungus, and it inhibits spore germination. It has translinear action, that is, it is absorbed by the leaf and moves around using the leaf�s circulatory system � it can also be used as a systemic. When it is applied to the irrigation water it is absorbed by the roots and delivered throughout the plant. Adding a 0.5% solution, about 1 teaspoon per quart, to the irrigation water will protect the plant from infection.
Neem oil is best used before the plant or the garden exhibits a major infection. By using it before powdery mildew appears, it prevents the spores from germinating. It should not be used on buds or flowers.
Oil Spray
Growers have used different oil sprays to prevent and cure fungal infections. Until recently most horticultural oil sprays were made from petroleum distillates. However, most organic growers have switched to using botanical oils. Aside from the safety factor botanicals such as cottonseed, jojoba, neem and sesame oils have fungicidal properties. They can be used in combination with other spray ingredients listed here. The oils are mixed at about 1-2% concentrations. A 1% solution is about a teaspoon per pint or 3 tablespoons per gallon. Add castile soap to help the ingredients mix. Oil sprays should only be used on the leaves, not the buds or flowers. Use weekly on new growth.
pH Up
pH-Up is a generic term for alkaline pH adjustors, used to increase water pH in indoor gardens. They come as either a powder or liquid. Its active ingredient is usually lye (KOH) or potash (K2CO3).
Fungi require an acidic environment to grow and die in alkaline environments. Changing the leaf surface environment from acidic to alkaline clears up the infection. An alkaline solution with a pH of 8 will make the environment inhospitable for the fungus and will stop its growth. This is one of the simplest means of controlling the fungus. It can be used on critically infected plants.
Potassium/Sodium Bicarbonate
Potassium bicarbonate (KHCO3) and Sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3) are wettable powders that change the pH of the leaf surface toward alkaline. Another reaction takes place; the fungus cell wall actually bursts in the presence of bicarbonate. Potassium is one of the macro-nutrients used by plants and therefore is preferred over sodium, as sodium can build up in the soil. Sodium bicarbonate can be found in your kitchen (baking soda), so some prefer it for ease of obtaining. Both are more effective when used with an oil and spreader such as castile soap. They can be used to cure bad infections and prevents new ones.
Use one teaspoon of bicarbonate powder, a teaspoon of oil and a few drops of castile soap in a pint of water, or 3 tablespoons each potassium bicarbonate and oil and a half teaspoon soap in a gallon of water. Spray on new growth.
Serenade� and Sonata�
Serenade� and Sonata� are composed of different bacteria. They use different pathways to stop mycellial growth. They are considered totally safe to humans and animals since the bacteria attack only fungi. Watch out if you are a mushroom, otherwise you are safe. The two bacteria work well together.
They are easy to use, quite safe and effective.
Sulfur
Sulfur has been used to control powdery mildew for centuries. Sulfur sprays can be used indoors but they are not popular because of residue that remains on the plant. In greenhouses gardeners use sulfur vaporizers that heat elemental sulfur to the point of vaporization. The sulfur condenses on all surfaces including the leaves. A fine deposit of very low pH sulfur granules covers the leaf surfaces. The low pH environment inhibits fungal growth. The heaters use a 60 watt light bulb to heat sulfur which is held in a container above the light. The bulb supplies enough heat to evaporate the sulfur, but not enough for it to ignite. The problem with vaporizers is that they also leave a fine sulfur film on the leaves and flowers.
Active mildew: 7 to 8 hours per night 1 to 2 times a week.
Preventative maintenance: 4 to 5 hours once a week
Vinegar
Apple cider vinegar is toxic to powdery mildew because of its high acidity (low pH). Use it at the rate of 1 tablespoon per quart of water several times a week . Some gardeners recommend alternating using vinegar with potassium bicarbonate and milk.
PREVENTION


•Isolate all new plants in a separate area where they can�t infect other plants.

•Filter incoming air to prevent spores from entering the room in the airstream.

•Install a germicidal UVC light, like the ones used in food handling areas. The light is fatal to all airborne organisms passing through the appliance. This will kill powdery mildew spores that are airborne.

•Spray the leaves with neem oil weekly. Neem oil presents both a physical barrier and a chemical deterrent.

•Cinnamon oil and cinnamon tea can also be sprayed as a powdery mildew preventative. If you are using cinnamon oil use 1 part oil to 200 parts water. (1 teaspoon oil in a liter of water.)


11 Back to top of the page up there ^
Proverbs 21:20  In the house of the wise are stores of choice food and oil,

but a foolish man devours all he has.

Offline Bill Quick

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Re: not for barter...but for free
« Reply #40 on: September 27, 2011, 08:54:17 PM »
Darn.  I wish I'd know about milk and powdery mildew.  The stuff has been wreaking havoc with my roses.  I'll give it a try.
"You can get a lot farther with a kind word and a gun than a kind word alone."  --   Al Capone

Offline Mr. Bingley

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Re: not for barter...but for free
« Reply #41 on: September 28, 2011, 05:43:23 AM »
thanks, amish! I'd love more seeds for next year.


 

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